Friday, October 24, 2014

Sponsor Spotlight: Silicon Valley FreeBSD Developer and Vendor Summit

The FreeBSD Foundation has been a long-time sponsor of events like the upcoming FreeBSD Developer and Vendor Summit. This year we would also like to thank Microsoft and RootBSD for their extended support of the event.  Opportunities to bring the developer and vendor communities together to further the Project would not be possible without the support of companies like these two. Please take a minute and find out more about why these organizations are involved with the FreeBSD Project.


Microsoft's customers have been clear that they want a single hypervisor for their environments, whether they are running Windows, Linux or FreeBSD operating systems. Microsoft is committed to working with the FreeBSD Foundation to ensure that FreeBSD is a first-class guest operating system on Windows Server Hyper-V and is focused on improving reliability, performance and support of new Hyper-V features in our upcoming updated release of BSD Integration Services. Find out more here.


RootBSD is a provider of hosting services with an emphasis on the BSD family of operating systems.   As users of FreeBSD ourselves, we believe it is important to contribute back to the community and do so by sponsoring services for individual developers as well as events such as the Developer's Summit.  We are thrilled to be able to support the Silicon Valley Developer's Summit, as we've seen first hand the results that face-to-face meetings can have in sparking new ideas and discussions that might not happen through strictly online communication. Find out more about RootBSD here.


Thursday, October 23, 2014

FreeBSD 10.1-RC3 Now Available

The third RC build of the 10.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available on the FTP servers for the amd64, armv6, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures.

The image checksums follow are included in the original announcement email.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing system, use the "releng/10.1" branch.

A list of changes since 10.0-RELEASE are available here.

Changes between 10.1-RC2 and 10.1-RC3 include:

  • Several fixes to the UDPLite protocol implementation.
  • The vt(4) driver has been updated to save and restore keyboard mode and LED states when switching windows.
  • Several fixes to the SCTP protocol implementation.
  • A potential race condition in obtaining a file pointer has been corrected.
  • Fix ZFS ZVOL deadlock and rename issues.
  • Restore libopie.so ABI compatibility with 10.0-RELEASE.
  • Removed the last vestige of MD5 password hashes.
  • Several rc(8) script updates and fixes.
  • bsdinstall(8) has been updated to allow selecting local_unbound in the default services to enable at first boot.
  • Prevent ZFS leaking pool free space.
  • Fix rtsold(8) remote buffer overflow vulnerability. [SA-14:20]
  • Fix routed(8) remote denial of service vulnerability. [SA-14:21]
  • Fix memory leak in sandboxed namei lookup. [SA-14:22]
  • OpenSSL has been updated to version 1.0.1j. [SA-14:23]
  • Fix an issue where a FreeBSD virtual machine provisioned in the Microsoft Azure service does not recognize the second attached disk on the system.
    Pre-installed virtual machine images for 10.1-RC3 are also available for amd64 and i386 architectures.  The images are located here.

    The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB, which decompress to a 20GB sparse image.

    The partition layout is:
    • 512k - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    • 1GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    • ~17GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)
    To install packages from the dvd1.iso installer, create and mount the /dist directory:

    # mkdir -p /dist
    # mount -t cd9660 /dev/cd0 /dist

    Next, install pkg(8) from the DVD:
     

    # env REPOS_DIR=/dist/packages/repos pkg bootstrap

    At this point, pkg-add(8) can be used to install additional packages from the DVD.  Please note, the REPOS_DIR environment variable should be used each time using the DVD as the package repository, otherwise conflicts with packages from the upstream mirrors may occur when they are fetched.  For example, to install Gnome and Xorg, run:
     

    # env REPOS_DIR=/dist/packages/repos pkg install \
      xorg-server xorg gnome2 [...]

    The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386 systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
    FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

    # freebsd-update upgrade -r 10.1-RC3

    During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
    performed merging was done correctly.

    # freebsd-update install

    The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before continuing.


    # shutdown -r now

    After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new userland components:


    # freebsd-update install
    It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible, especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
    FreeBSD 8.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat9x and other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
    into the new userland:

    # shutdown -r now

    Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove stale files:

    # freebsd-update install

    Love FreeBSD?  Support this and future releases with a donation to the FreeBSD Foundation!

    Wednesday, October 22, 2014

    FreeBSD Foundation Goes to EuroBSDcon 2014

    We were thrilled to be a Gold Sponsor and to attend EuroBSDCon 2014 held in Sofia, Bulgaria September 27-28. We were also a sponsor of the developer summit. The conference was well attended, with over 225 people there.

    Students working together on a project
    Not only did we sponsor four FreeBSD contributors to attend the conference, but with help from Google providing women computer scientists scholarships, I saw more women attending this conference than I had ever seen before.

    I attend these events to touch base with the FreeBSD user and developer community. It’s a chance for
    me to find out what people are working on, what kind of help they could use from the Foundation, feedback on what we can be doing to support the FreeBSD Project and community, and what features/functions people want supported in FreeBSD. In addition, the other Foundation members, who are active developers, writers, and teachers in the FreeBSD world, attend, not only to connect with the community, but also go to sessions to get a more in-depth understanding of new features and functions, as well as learn what others are working on.

    During the event, we held our fall fundraising campaign and raised over $2,000 in donations! One lucky donor won a copy of the newly released Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System (2nd Edition). Thank you to everyone who donated.

    It really was a great opportunity to meet FreeBSD contributors from around the world. Attendees were mostly from Europe, including Spain, Belgium, Switzerland, France, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Russia, and Germany. There were also people from Japan, Canada, and the US. Every time I attend one of these BSD-related conferences, I’m blown away by the excitement and passion these people have and share. I’m full of admiration as I watch these dedicated people interact with each other, sharing information on their projects, helping each other with their work, and inspiring new people to get involved. I love watching the newbies interact with the more seasoned FreeBSD contributors (Rockstars!), as the latter instills a sense a pride, curiosity, and engagement in FreeBSD. It’s a chance for people to work face-to-face, get inspired, and learn about areas to get involved with. So much work gets accomplished at these conferences.
    Kirk about to give a presentation

    We had 7 Foundation board and staff members attend the conference. Kirk McKusick gave a two day tutorial on the FreeBSD Kernel Internals based on the newly released 2nd edition of The Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System. He also gave a talk on the implementation of ZFS in FreeBSD. Erwin Lansing chaired the DNS and Ports sessions of the developer summit, while Ed Maste gave a presentation on the current state of the LLDB debugger in FreeBSD. On the FreeBSD Journal front, George Neville-Neil was able to recruit more material.

    The Foundation also held a board meeting which focused on advocacy in Europe and how to approach more European companies to help facilitate collaboration with the Project, as well as seeking more donations from that part of the world. We held many discussions with FreeBSD developers on current and future projects, increasing efforts for greater collaboration on graphics stack maintenance and a variety of technical topics.
    Working the FreeBSD Foundation table

    Overall, it was another successful conference and we are looking forward to participating in next year’s European conference in Stockholm, Sweden.

    --contributed by Deb Goodkin, FreeBSD Foundation Executive Director

    Monday, October 20, 2014

    EuroBSDCon Trip Report: Bjoern Heidotting

    The FreeBSD Foundation was a gold sponsor of EuroBSDCon 2014, which was held in Sofia, Bulgaria in September. The Foundation also sponsored Bjoern Heidotting to attend the conference, who provides the following trip report:

    Since I'm fairly new to the FreeBSD community I would like to introduce myself first. My name is Bjoern Heidotting, I live in Germany, I work as a system administrator and I'm a FreeBSD user since 2006 and a contributor since 2012. I mostly contribute patches for the German documentation in the doc-tree. Why do I contribute? Well, the short version is that I simply wanted to give something back to FreeBSD and the community.

    Thanks to Benedict Reuschling, who invited me, and the FreeBSD Foundation, I was able to attend the DevSummit and the conference at EuroBSDCon 2014 in Sofia.

    I arrived at Sofia airport on Wednesday and I took a taxi to get to my hotel the Best Western Expo, directly located at the IEC where the conference was held. However, the taxidriver decided to take me on a sightseeing tour through the city of Sofia. But after 1,5 hours I finally arrived at the hotel. The actual time to get from the airport to my hotel is about 10 minutes. Fortunately taxis are cheap in Bulgaria compared to Germany. And the city is really, really worth seeing.

    Later that day, I met Daniel Peyrolon, a GSoC student with whom I shared a room. We decided to take dinner together and started getting to know each other. Afterwards, we socialized with some other FreeBSD people at the hotel bar.

    On Thursday the DevSummit started with every attendee and developer introducing himself. Then some interesting topics and roadmaps were discussed for the upcoming 11.0 release, as well as other topics such as ASLR, UEFI, 10G Ethernet, just to name a few. It was a very interesting brainstorming with valuable input from all attendees. Since it was my first time at a DevSummit, I was impressed to see how fast these people can fill a bunch of foils with topics and ideas. Awesome!

    After lunch a small group, including me, sat together in another room where I started to work on several patches for the Handbook. In the evening we had dinner at Lebed Restaurant. A very nice location. This is where I first met Deb Goodkin from the Foundation. She was the one I talked to prior to the conference and she brought Daniel and me together. Thank you Deb. It was very nice meeting her.

    On Friday I mostly worked on a big patch for the network-servers section in the Handbook. I also met Beat Gaetzi while catching fresh air outside and we talked about our roles in the Project and what we do. After lunch the documentation topic started, which I was very interested in. We talked about issues on the website, Handbook sections, etc. The details of the session can be found on the wiki.

    In the evening we had dinner at "The Windmill" and I met Henning Brauer from the OpenBSD project. It was really fun talking to him. Man, this guy can tell crazy stories.

    Saturday and Sunday were conference days with one interesting talk chasing the next. All the talks were great, altough I had some favorites, including "Snapshots, Replication, and Boot-Environments" by Kris Moore, "Introducing ASLR in FreeBSD" by Shawn Webb, and "Securing sensitive & restricted data" by Dag-Erling Smorgrav. One of the highlights for me was the social event in Hotel Balkan on Saturday. Again, meeting the people behind the email addresses and talking to them was a great experience.

    A big thanks goes out to Shteryana Shopova and her crew for organizing this great event.

    Monday, October 13, 2014

    FreeBSD 10.1-RC2 Now Available

    The second RC build of the 10.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available on the FTP servers for the amd64, armv6, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures.

    The image checksums follow are included in the original announcement email.

    Installer images and memory stick images are available here.

    If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR system or on the -stable mailing list.

    If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing system, use the "releng/10.1" branch.

    A list of changes since 10.0-RELEASE are available here.

    Changes between 10.1-RC1 and 10.1-RC2 include:

    • Fix XHCI driver for devices which have more than 15 physical root HUB ports.
    • Fix old iSCSI initiator to work with new CAM locking.
    • Fix page length reported for Block Limits VPD page.
    • Add QCOW v1 & v2 support to mkimg(1).
    Pre-installed virtual machine images for 10.1-RC2 are also available for amd64 and i386 architectures.  The images are located here.

    The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB, which decompress to a 20GB sparse image.

    The partition layout is:
    • 512k - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    • 1GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    • ~17GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)
    To install packages from the dvd1.iso installer, create and mount the /dist directory:

    # mkdir -p /dist
    # mount -t cd9660 /dev/cd0 /dist

    Next, install pkg(8) from the DVD:
     

    # env REPOS_DIR=/dist/packages/repos pkg bootstrap

    At this point, pkg-add(8) can be used to install additional packages from the DVD.  Please note, the REPOS_DIR environment variable should be used each time using the DVD as the package repository, otherwise conflicts with packages from the upstream mirrors may occur when they are fetched.  For example, to install Gnome and Xorg, run:
     

    # env REPOS_DIR=/dist/packages/repos pkg install \
      xorg-server xorg gnome2 [...]

    The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386 systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
    FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

    # freebsd-update upgrade -r 10.1-RC2

    During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
    performed merging was done correctly.

    # freebsd-update install

    The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before continuing.


    # shutdown -r now

    After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new userland components:


    # freebsd-update install
    It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible, especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
    FreeBSD 8.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat9x and other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
    into the new userland:

    # shutdown -r now

    Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove stale files:

    # freebsd-update install

    Love FreeBSD?  Support this and future releases with a donation to the FreeBSD Foundation!

    Saturday, October 4, 2014

    FreeBSD 10.1-RC1 Now Available

    The first RC build of the 10.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available on the FTP servers for the amd64, armv6, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures.

    The image checksums follow are included in the original announcement email.

    Installer images and memory stick images are available here.

    If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR system or on the -stable mailing list.

    If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing system, use the "releng/10.1" branch.

    A list of changes since 10.0-RELEASE are available here.

    Changes between 10.1-BETA3 and 10.1-RC1 include:

    • A bug that would cause all processes to appear to have the parent PID of '1' has been fixed.
    • Various updates to bsdinstall(8) and bsdconfig(8).
    • The Hyper-V KVP (key-value pair) driver has been added, and enabled by default on amd64 and i386 architectures.
    Pre-installed virtual machine images for 10.1-RC1 are also available for amd64 and i386 architectures.  The images are located here.

    The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB, which decompress to a 20GB sparse image.

    The partition layout is:
    • 512k - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    • 1GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    • ~17GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)
    To install packages from the dvd1.iso installer, create and mount the /dist directory:

    # mkdir -p /dist
    # mount -t cd9660 /dev/cd0 /dist

    Next, install pkg(8) from the DVD:
     

    # env REPOS_DIR=/dist/packages/repos pkg bootstrap

    At this point, pkg-add(8) can be used to install additional packages from the DVD.  Please note, the REPOS_DIR environment variable should be used each time using the DVD as the package repository, otherwise conflicts with packages from the upstream mirrors may occur when they are fetched.  For example, to install Gnome and Xorg, run:
     

    # env REPOS_DIR=/dist/packages/repos pkg install \
      xorg-server xorg gnome2 [...]

    The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386 systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
    FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

    # freebsd-update upgrade -r 10.1-BETA3

    During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
    performed merging was done correctly.

    # freebsd-update install

    The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before continuing.


    # shutdown -r now

    After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new userland components:


    # freebsd-update install
    It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible, especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
    FreeBSD 8.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat9x and other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
    into the new userland:

    # shutdown -r now

    Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove stale files:

    # freebsd-update install

    Love FreeBSD?  Support this and future releases with a donation to the FreeBSD Foundation!

    Friday, October 3, 2014

    Foundation at Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing

    The FreeBSD Foundation is excited to be participating in the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing conference to be held in Phoenix, AZ on October 8-10. As many of you know, Rear Admiral Grace Hopper was a pioneer in computing, inventor of the first compiler, and the first person to record a (literal) bug. This year's annual conference in her honor has a full registration of 8,000 women computing technologists from all over the world.

    The Foundation is a Silver non-profit sponsor for this event and will have a booth in the Expo area. In addition to informational brochures and Foundation pens, we'll be giving away some stickers created for this event. The stickers say "I choose FreeBSD because I know my ability to create the future has nothing to do with my gender and everything to do with my skills".

    As part of this year's Grace Hopper Open Source Day on October 8, Dru Lavigne will be presenting "An Introduction to FreeBSD" at 14:00 in rooms South 164-166.

    Shteryana Shopova will be hosting a lunchtime table topic on FreeBSD at table #12 on October 9 from 12:45 to 15:30.

    Registration has closed for this event as it has reached its maximum capacity. However, if you know a woman technologist who is attending, let her know about the FreeBSD booth, presentation, and lunchtime table topic.